Please reload

Bài viết mới

Giới thiệu trang web quyhocbongttls.org

1/1
Please reload

IELTS Preparation Series 3, Episode 11: Grammatical Range in the Speaking Test

September 4, 2016

 

(Bấm vào đây để chọn bài học kế tiếp)

 

Xem lời thoại bên dưới:

 

0:12

Hello, and welcome to Study English, IELTS Preparation. I'm Margot Politis.

0:18

Knowing how to compare and contrast is something you are likely to need for the IELTS Speaking

0:23

Test.

0:25

There are a number of grammatical structures that you can use to make comparisons and express

0:30

differences.

0:32

Listen to this candidate comparing and contrasting his teachers:

0:37

What differences in teaching styles have you experienced with different teachers?

0:42

Well, I think, you have to make a difference between a teacher's knowledge and personal

0:46

style. Some teachers, you know, are very knowledgeable and have a lot of experience and everything.

0:53

Both my history and science teachers knew their subjects really well, but my maths teacher,

0:59

who was much older - maybe that's why - just didn't have the skills to convey all that

1:05

to the students. If I were to compare all my classes, I would say his were the most

1:11

boring. My history teacher, on the other hand, he knew how to communicate to students and

1:18

his lessons were more enjoyable and we learnt faster.

1:22

He said that "both my history and science teachers knew their subjects".

1:28

He uses the word 'both' to say 'the two together'. They're similar in the way they know a lot

1:34

about their subjects. He then contrasts them to the maths teacher by using the word 'but'.

1:43

Listen:

1:44

Both my history and science teachers knew their subjects really well, but my maths teacher,

1:51

who was much older - maybe that's why - just didn't have the skills to convey all that

1:56

to the students.

1:58

To justify the contrast he compares the ages of the teachers. The maths teacher is much

2:05

older. Older is a comparative adjective. Someone who is 50 is older than someone who is 40.

2:16

'Much older' is a way of saying the difference is larger - someone who is 80 is much older

2:23

than someone who is 40.

2:26

He also compares the teaching styles of his teachers:

2:30

If I were to compare all my classes, I would say his were the most boring.

2:36

This time he uses the superlative - the most boring, because he is comparing more than

2:42

2 things. He does this using a conditional 'if' sentence which is a polite way of criticising

2:49

someone:

2:50

If I were to compare all my classes, I would say his were the most boring.

2:57

He goes on to talk about his history teacher. How does he show that he is comparing him

3:02

to the boring maths teacher? My history teacher, on the other hand, he

3:08

knew how to communicate to students and his lessons were more enjoyable and we learnt

3:13

faster.

3:14

He says 'on the other hand' to show that he is now talking about a different style of

3:20

teaching. And again he uses comparative forms - more enjoyable and faster - to express this

3:29

difference.

3:34

Now listen to another candidate responding to a question designed to encourage her to

3:39

compare and contrast:

3:41

Is it better to grow up in the city or in the countryside?

3:45

Well, I think that, mm, both places have their pros and cons. I've grown up in a city, and

3:56

I've lived in a city all my life. And sometimes when I see those families who have their kids

4:02

in the countryside I envy them, because they can run about, you know. They are free and

4:12

the environment is cleaner and safer, but then, on the other hand, you know, living

4:18

in a city gives you other, um, opportunities to socialise, have more contact with culture,

4:24

and better opportunities for education. So, I don't know. It's difficult to say. Both

4:31

things have advantages and disadvantages.

4:36

She begins by saying that "both places have their pros and cons". Saying 'both' means

4:43

she is referring to the city and the country. Pros and cons is an idiom meaning advantages

4:52

and disadvantages. Then she establishes that her point of view is that of a city person:

5:00

I've grown up in a city, and I've lived in a city all my life.

5:06

Then she says what the advantages - the pros - of living in the country are:

5:11

Sometimes when I see those families who have their kids in the countryside I envy them,

5:19

because they can run about, you know. They are free and the environment is cleaner and

5:27

safer.

5:28

The advantages are that in the country you can run about and be free. She also uses the

5:35

comparative adjectives 'cleaner' and 'safer' to describe the country compared to the city.

5:43

Often you use comparatives with 'than' a word that means 'in comparison with'.

5:50

The country is cleaner than the city.

5:55

She chooses to contrast with the word 'but' and talk about the advantages of living in

6:00

the city:

6:01

They are free and the environment is cleaner and safer, but then, on the other hand, you

6:09

know, living in a city gives you other, um, opportunities to socialise, have more contact

6:15

with culture, and better opportunities for education.

6:20

Like the previous candidate, she uses the phrase 'on the other hand' to show she is

6:25

talking about something different - the city.

6:30

And again she uses the language of comparison, this time the irregular comparative form of

6:36

good, 'better'. Listen again:

6:40

They are free and the environment is cleaner and safer, but then, on the other hand, you

6:48

know, living in a city gives you other, um, opportunities to socialise, have more contact

6:53

with culture, and better opportunities for education.

6:58

Now let's listen to the way she rounds off her comparison of city and country living:

7:04

So, I don't know. It's difficult to say. Both things have advantages and disadvantages.

7:11

She ends by saying both have advantages and disadvantages which means that one isn't better

7:18

than the other. You don't have to say that one thing is better than another if you don't

7:23

think so. The phrase for this is 'as good as'. She thinks that the country is as good

7:30

as the city.

7:35

The structures you use to compare things in the speaking test are assessed as grammatical

7:41

range and accuracy, one of the IELTS marking criteria. Other things that are assessed in

7:47

this area are the number of mistakes you make and the range of sentence types you use.

7:54

Don't be overly concerned about being perfectly correct all the time. Some mistakes will occur

7:59

in your speech.

8:04

It's good to review the rules for forming comparatives.

8:07

One syllable words have the -er comparative form: big, bigger

8:15

You need to memorise the forms for 2 syllable words because they can be either -er or have

8:22

'more' before them: narrow, narrower

8:27

useful, more useful

8:30

Words of 3 syllables and longer have the 'more' form:

8:36

intelligent, more intelligent spectacular, more spectacular

8:44

You can emphasise the degree of difference and say 'much older'.

8:50

With 'more intelligent', you say 'much more intelligent' and with 'more spectacular',

8:58

you say 'much more spectacular'.

9:05

And don't forget to review irregular comparative adjectives like:

9:09

good, better bad, worse

9:14

far, further or farther

9:20

Whenever a question has a comparative adjective in it, you can be confident that you are expected

9:25

to reply with the language of comparison.

9:32

That's all for now. To find more information about grammatical range and accuracy in the

9:37

Speaking Test visit our Study English website. The address is: australianetwork.com/studyenglish.

9:41

Good luck with your studies. Bye.

 

Share on Facebook
Please reload

         TTLS Blog

TTLS

quy hoc bong ttls

Tương Lai Tươi Sáng Là Sẻ Chia

Ủng hộ Quỹ học bổng TTLS
Góc Học Bổng