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IELTS Preparation Series 1, Episode 22: Finance

September 3, 2016

 

(Bấm vào đây để xem/nghe bài kế tiếp)

 

Xem lời thoại bên dưới:

 

0:14

Hello. I'm Margot Politis. Welcome to another episode of Study English, IELTS preparation.

0:20

Today we're going to listen to a finance report. It's filled with numbers and amounts, expressed

0:26

in a variety of ways.

0:27

It's important to be able to understand and describe numerical data using decimals, fractions

0:34

and currencies.

0:35

Listen to the day's finance report.

0:38

The Australian dollar, today Tuesday the 11th of November, continues to rise against the

0:44

US dollar, buying just over 70 cents, a 15 year high.

0:49

Against other currencies, however, the trend is a little different, falling against the

0:53

pound, closing at 0.425, a slight drop on yesterday, and 0.61 euros. The yen is also

1:02

strengthening at 71.95, and considerably higher against the greenback at 111.03 yen.

1:11

The Dow Jones Index closed today at 9809.79, a fall of 47.18 on yesterday's trading.

1:20

The Sydney Stock Market doubled its trading yesterday with BHP Billiton trading heavily.

1:26

The latest retail figures showed that turnover grew by 3.2% in the June quarter, the fastest

1:32

quarterly growth rate for five and a half years. At the same time, unemployment fell

1:37

to its lowest level in twelve and a half years.

1:40

OK, first we're going to look at decimals, and how you express them. Listen carefully

1:46

again.

1:47

Against other currencies, however, the trend is a little different, falling against the

1:52

pound, closing at 0.425, a slight drop on yesterday, and 0.61 euros. The yen is also

2:00

strengthening at 71.95, and considerably higher against the greenback at 111.03 yen.

2:10

The Dow Jones Index closed today at 9809.79, a fall of 47.18 on yesterday's trading.

2:19

In English, decimals are written with a point, not a comma.

2:23

So we write 4.25, 6.1.

2:28

When you say the numbers after the decimal point, you say them all separately, as individual

2:35

numbers.

2:36

So we have:

2:37

seventy one point nine five

2:41

forty seven point one eight

2:45

nine thousand eight hundred and nine point seven nine

2:50

Notice that a zero is often spoken as 'oh'.

2:54

Practice saying these numbers:

2:59

three hundred and twenty six point oh one

3:04

four point eight nine seven

3:11

nine hundred and two point three oh eight

3:15

Listen again:

3:17

Against other currencies, however, the trend is a little different, falling against the

3:21

pound, closing at 0.425, a slight drop on yesterday, and 0.61 euros. The yen is also

3:30

strengthening at 71.95, and considerably higher against the greenback at 111.03 yen.

3:39

The Dow Jones Index closed today at 9809.79, a fall of 47.18 on yesterday's trading.

3:48

The Sydney Stock Market doubled its trading yesterday with BHP Billiton trading heavily.

3:54

You can hear that when using numbers, there are often alternatives, and many choices you

3:59

can make.

3:59

So conversationally, we would usually say one hundred and eleven point oh three, but

4:08

will also often hear one hundred and eleven point zero three.

4:13

Here, we could say: zero point four two five

4:17

nought point four two five or even just point four two five

4:23

Notice that in North America, people usually say zero, not nought or 'oh'.

4:29

OK, now the other way of expressing numbers less than one is using fractions.

4:35

Listen to the fractions here.

4:37

The latest retail figures showed that turnover grew by 3.2% in the June quarter, the fastest

4:43

quarterly growth rate for five and a half years. At the same time, unemployment fell

4:48

to its lowest level in twelve and a half years.

4:52

She uses the most common fraction - a half.

4:57

Listen to how we say common fractions:

4:59

a half

5:00

a third

5:01

a quarter

5:02

two thirds

5:05

five eights

5:06

three quarters

5:08

Notice that once you understand the pattern, you can express any fraction you want.

5:13

Try these:

5:15

seven eighteenths

5:17

16 thirtieths

5:19

14 fortieths

5:20

OK, now listen again to some of the report. Listen for different currencies:

5:28

Against other currencies, however, the trend is a little different, falling against the

5:33

pound, closing at 0.425, a slight drop on yesterday, and 0.61 euros. The yen is also

5:41

strengthening at 71.95, and considerably higher against the greenback at 111.03 yen.

5:50

There were a number of different currencies mentioned in that clip:

5:55

the pound; the euro; the yen; the greenback.

6:00

Let's have a look at them.

6:02

Lots of countries use a dollar.

6:05

In Australia, the Australian dollar is usually expressed with the dollar sign.

6:10

But internationally, it's written like this AUD. We read this the Australian dollar.

6:18

In United States, they use the dollar as well. It's the USD, the United States dollar. But

6:27

often called the greenback, because it's green.

6:31

In Great Britain they use the pound. It is written GBP, but it's often called the pound

6:38

sterling.

6:39

In the European Union, they use the euro dollar, written like this - EUR.

6:46

In Japan, it's the yen, written JPY.

6:51

In China, it's the yuan, written CNY, and the renminbi, RMB.

6:59

Notice that we write the currency before the number, but we say it after the number.

7:05

So we read:

7:06

two dollars.

7:08

or four pounds fifteen.

7:11

Notice also how we read longer numbers:

7:14

three thousand, four hundred and seventy Japanese yen

7:19

one hundred and ninety two Australian dollars

7:22

Notice that when spoken naturally the one often becomes 'a' and the 'and' becomes squashed.

7:30

We don't say one hundred and ninety two but a hundred n ninety two.

7:36

Try this one:

7:40

a hundred and twenty seven thousand, three hundred and twenty two Hong Kong dollars

7:46

OK, now let's listen to the report again, and then we'll look at another important use

7:51

of numbers.

7:52

The Australian dollar, today Tuesday the 11th of November, continues to rise against the

7:57

US dollar, buying just over 70 cents, a 15 year high.

8:03

Notice that she says Tuesday the 11th of November.

8:07

Saying simple things like the date can be confusing in English, as the way they're said

8:14

varies.

8:15

In Australia, we say the 11th of November, or November the 11th. Notice that it's written

8:22

without the words 'the', or 'of'.

8:27

For the 13th of February 2005, Australians would write this: 13.05.2005.

8:36

But in North America, they'd write it: 02.13.2005.

8:41

You'll need to learn these to make sure you don't turn up somewhere on the wrong day!

8:50

So remember that in Australia they write the date: day dot month dot year,

9:00

but in North America, they write: month dot day dot year.

9:07

And there is an international standard that says the format should be: year dot month

9:14

dot day.

9:16

With numbers, dates, times, there are all sorts of variations. Just make sure you understand

9:22

the currency, the time and the date, or you could find yourself in all sorts of trouble!

9:27

And I'll see you soon for more Study English!

9:30

Bye bye.

 

 

 

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