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IELTS Preparation Series 3, Episode 19: Labelling a Flow Chart


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Xem lời thoại bên dưới:

0:00

Hello, and

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welcome to Study English, IELTS Preparation. I'm Margot Politis.

0:17

One of the skills in the listening test is listening for specific information. Here's

0:23

a story about a process - making spectacles - or glasses.

0:29

People like my frames because they're individually made for them, they're uniquely Australian,

0:34

there's an air of exclusivity about it, and they're fun to wear. My name's Roger Henley, I'm a spectacle frame-maker

0:48

in Adelaide. I'm one of three in Australia that produces hand-made spectacle frames.

0:56

My interest in frame-making started in 1978 when, as an apprentice optical mechanic, I

1:02

felt I could make spectacle frames. So in 1987 I actually left my job and started a

1:08

business of making spectacle frames.

1:09

The frame-making process, in brief, involves over 50 steps. I'll just go through a few

1:20

of them. The first step is to mill the front out on a CAD milling machine. It then has

1:30

a heat-sink joint inserted into the frame front. It is then heated in an oven to its

1:40

memory set point, which is 110 degrees C, and then placed in a mould which then gives

1:45

it its curvature or meniscus on the frame.

1:49

There's a lot of information there, and sometimes it's hard to hear the specific thing you're

1:54

listening for. How can you prepare for this? First - listen for the key words in the question.

2:01

Look at this question:

2:02

Who is Roger Henley?

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The key words are 'who' and 'Roger Henley'. So listen for the name Roger Henley in the

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listening passage:

2:17

People like my frames because they're individually made for them, they're uniquely Australian,

2:22

there's an air of exclusivity about it, and they're fun to wear. My name's Roger Henley, I'm a spectacle frame-maker

2:37

in Adelaide. I'm one of three in Australia that produces hand-made spectacle frames.

2:43

My name's Roger Henley, I'm a spectacle frame-maker in Adelaide. He describes who he is, by saying

2:52

what he does, immediately after he says his name.

2:55

My name's Roger Henley, I'm a spectacle frame-maker in Adelaide. I'm one of three in Australia

3:01

that produces hand-made spectacle frames.

3:04

Look at this question:

3:06

When did he begin manufacturing glasses?

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The key words are 'when', 'begin' and 'manufacturing glasses' and because the question asks 'when'

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- you need to listen for a date.

3:20

I'm one of three in Australia that produces hand-made spectacle frames. My interest in

3:28

frame-making started in 1978 when, as an apprentice optical mechanic, I felt I could make spectacle

3:33

frames. So in 1987 I actually left my job and started a business of making spectacle

3:39

frames. There were two dates - 1978 and 1987. Which

3:46

one is correct? You need to listen for words that mean the same as the key words in the

3:52

question - 'begin', 'manufacturing', and 'glasses'.

3:58

I'm one of three in Australia that produces hand-made spectacle frames. My interest in

4:05

frame-making started in 1978 when, as an apprentice optical mechanic, I felt I could make spectacle

4:11

frames. So in 1987 I actually left my job and started a business of making spectacle

4:17

frames.

4:18

We know 'spectacles' is another word for 'glasses'. 'Started' is another word for 'began', and

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'making' is another word for 'manufacturing'.

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So in 1987 I actually left my job and started a business of making spectacle frames.

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So the answer is 1987. Remember when you're looking at questions and key words - to look

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especially for 'wh' words - who, where, when, which, why - and for information that will

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answer those questions:

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Who a person or persons

4:57

Where a place

4:58

When a time or date

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Which a specific example

5:03

Why a reason

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And also remember to listen for synonyms for your key words - words which mean the same

5:12

thing as the key word.

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In the test, note how many words your answer can be - it might be two or three. You must

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not use more than two or three words in your answer.

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Here's another question: How many stages are there in the frame-making process? Use no

5:34

more than two words in your answer. Listen:

5:38

The frame-making process, in brief, involves over 50 steps. I'll just go through a few

5:44

of them. The first step is to mill the front out on a CAD milling machine. It then has

5:55

a heat-sink joint inserted into the frame front. It is then heated in an oven to its

6:04

memory set point, which is 110 degrees C, and then placed in a mould which then gives

6:09

it its curvature or meniscus on the frame.

6:13

The question 'how many?' tells us the answer must be a number. And what word is a synonym

6:20

for 'stages?' Listen again.

6:23

The frame-making process, in brief, involves over 50 steps. I'll just go through a few

6:29

of them.

6:30

'Steps' is a synonym for 'stages', so you could write: 50 steps, or over 50 steps, or

6:40

over 50. Which is correct?

6:44

The only correct answer is 'over 50'. It answers the question - how many stages are there in

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the frame-making process. '50 steps' is incorrect because there are more than fifty, and 'over

6:59

50 steps' is incorrect, because you were asked to use no more than two words.

7:05

Another type of question in the listening test involves labelling a diagram, or chart.

7:15

Listen to Roger Henley describing the first four stages of the frame-making process:

7:21

The first step is to mill the front out on a CAD milling machine. It then has a heat-sink joint inserted into

7:33

the frame front. It is then heated in an oven to its memory set point, which is 110 degrees

7:42

C, and then placed in a mould which then gives it its curvature or meniscus on the frame.

7:49

Here are those four stages as a flow chart, with words missing.

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You need to listen for 'what' words complete these four stages. What kind of word will

7:59

you listen for? Look at the first one:

8:03

In processes, simple present passive voice is often used, as it is here. So probably

8:11

the word needed is a participle.

8:14

The first step is to mill the front out on a CAD milling machine.

8:19

So the word missing is the participle formed of the verb 'to mill' - milled.

8:26

The second missing word is also a participle to complete a passive sentence.

8:31

The first step is to mill the front out on a CAD milling machine. It then has a heat-sink

8:38

joint inserted into the frame front.

8:41

The missing word is 'inserted'.

8:44

In the third example the gap is before the symbol for 'degrees centigrade' - so you should

8:50

be listening for a number.

8:53

The first step is to mill the front out on a CAD milling machine. It then has a heat-sink

9:00

joint inserted into the frame front. It is then heated in an oven to its memory set point,

9:06

which is 110 degrees C. So you should write 110 in the space.

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And in the final example, notice that the gap follows the indefinite article 'a'. So

9:19

you know the word must be a noun.

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It is then heated in an oven to its memory set point, which is 110 degrees C. And then

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placed in a mould which then gives it its curvature or meniscus on the frame.

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It is placed in a mould, which is a form to give shape to something.

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That's all for now.

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To watch this episode again and all the Study English programs, visit our website.

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(The address is: australianetwork.com/studyenglish)

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Good luck with your studies.

#II23Ieltsprepseries3

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