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IELTS Preparation Series 3, Episode 8: Speaking Fluently


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Xem lời thoại bên dưới:

0:12

Hello, and welcome to Study English, IELTS Preparation. I'm Margot Politis.

0:17

One of the skills that is assessed in the IELTS speaking test is fluency.

0:24

Fluency is speaking at a natural pace without hesitating too much.

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But fluency doesn't mean speaking quickly. Sometimes, speaking too fast can make it harder

0:35

to be understood.

0:37

Another aspect of fluency is the smoothness of your speech. This means that you don't

0:44

always stop to try to think of the right word.

0:47

Listen as the golfer in the next clip talks about her career:

0:51

Golf is a very interesting game. Um It can be very frustrating and annoying and um but

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then, you know, it can be just, it can be really fun and challenging which makes it

1:05

fun I guess. When I'm not competing um, I try to practise every day for at least 6 hours

1:13

and if I play 18 holes er I'll still try and practise for another 3 or 4 hours.

1:21

You may have noticed that she used expressions such as 'um' , 'like' , 'you know' and 'I

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guess'. These are called fillers. It's natural to use fillers but be careful not to overuse

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them. Listen to her again:

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On top of that I guess I have err like work outs, and um gym work outs and I try to do

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that 3 to 4 times a week. So they're pretty long hours. In January this year I went to

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the ladies European tour qualifying school and I managed to secure a conditional card

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for the season so I decided to turn pro. This meant that, you know, I'd give up my amateur

2:07

status and I'd be playing for money I guess is the main difference.

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Fillers are used to tell your listener that you haven't finished, but you are thinking

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of what to say next. They don't carry meaning like words do.

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Now let's listen to a speaking test candidate using fillers:

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Mm, ok, well, one of the buildings I really like in Sydney is the Queen Victoria Building.

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Um, I've been here for a year only in Sydney, so I haven't had the chance to actually visit

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many public buildings, but I know this one very well. Um, I like it because, um, it's

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got a very interesting old style, and, er, it's very elegant, it's very spacious. I don't

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like the modern type of buildings, you know, with many storeys and er, very modern and

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contemporary. Um, I like the Queen Victoria Building, um, because it's elegant.

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To begin her talk she uses several fillers:

3:18

Mm, ok, well, one of the buildings I really like in Sydney is the Queen Victoria Building.

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Saying 'Mm, ok, well', helps her get started on the topic of her favourite building. She

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is thinking of what to say and not how to say it.

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She uses 'um and 'er' to give her time to think of what to say next at points in her

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speech, such as at the beginning of a sentence when she's linking information back to what

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she's just said:

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…one of the buildings I really like in Sydney is the Queen Victoria Building.

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Um, I've been here for a year only in Sydney…

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Next, she uses fillers just after