TTLS

quy hoc bong ttls

Tương Lai Tươi Sáng Là Sẻ Chia

IELTS Preparation Series 1, Episode 19: Weather report


(Bấm vào đây để xem/nghe bài kế tiếp)

Xem lời thoại bên dưới:

0:14

Hello. I'm Margot Politis. Welcome to Study English, IELTS preparation.

0:19

Today we're going to listen to a weather report.

0:22

We're going to listen for numbers, and practise saying and spelling them.

0:27

Listen to the weather in Sydney.

0:30

Good morning. It looks like being another glorious summer day in Sydney.

0:34

Temperatures will range from a minimum of 16°C in Richmond and 17°C in the city,

0:40

with maximum temperatures reaching the high 20s, with 29 in Richmond and 27 in the city

0:46

by early afternoon. This summer promises to be the warmest since 1987. The average minimum

0:52

for this time of year is 15°C and the average maximum is 22°C.

0:58

Humidity will be high again today, ranging from 80-90% across the metropolitan area,

1:04

and possibly for the next 5 or 6 days.

1:07

Sunrise will be at 5.45 am and the sun will set at 7.43 pm. The next full moon will be

1:14

on December 9th.

1:16

For those interested in fishing and surfing, windy conditions will prevail all day with

1:21

winds gusting from the southeast from 10-15 knots, then easing to 10-11 knots by late

1:28

afternoon. Swells along all Sydney beaches will range from 1 - 1.5 metres.

1:34

So counting and numbers are a very important part of language. You need them to talk about

1:40

how much things cost, what you earn, telephone numbers, visa cards, passports, addresses

1:47

and dates.

1:48

Being able to listen for and understand numbers is an important academic skill.

1:55

There are some conventions you need to learn, and you'll need to do a lot of practice listening

1:59

for and saying numbers.

2:01

Let's get started.

2:03

Listen to these pairs of numbers:

2:04

13, 30

2:09

14, 40

2:12

15, 50

2:13

16, 60

2:17

Now you try these ones:

2:21

17, 70

2:24

18, 80

2:28

19, 90

2:30

They sound very similar. You'll need to listen carefully so you don't get these mixed up.

2:36

Temperatures will range from a minimum of 16°C in Richmond and 17°C in the city.

2:42

Humidity will be high again today, ranging from 80-90% across the metropolitan area.

2:49

The temperature in Richmond is 16 degrees Celsius.

2:54

The humidity is 80 - 90%.

2:58

Did you hear these numbers correctly?

3:00

If you don't understand what someone's said, ask them to repeat, and stress the key syllable.

3:07

And that will be 16 dollars.

3:09

Did you say sixTEEN, or sixTY?

3:14

Usually the first syllable in a number is stressed.

3:16

16, 60

3:20

Notice that it is the final 'n' in teen that you have to be careful with.

3:25

-teen, -ty

3:28

But, of course, when you're listening for numbers, you can often work out the correct

3:31

amount by the context. Try to always be aware of what seems right, even if you didn't quite

3:37

hear properly.

3:40

Pronunciation of years can sometimes be difficult as well.

3:44

Listen to the clip:

3:45

This summer promises to be the warmest since 1987.

3:49

1987. NINEteen EIGHty seven.

3:54

Notice where the stress comes.

3:56

NINEteen NINETY nine.

3:58

Let's practice some more:

4:01

2001, two thousand and one

4:03

1932, nineteen thirty two

4:05

2040 twenty forty, or perhaps this will be read as two thousand and forty. I guess we'll

4:10

have to wait and see!

4:12

Notice 40 is spelt forty, not like four and fourteen.

4:18

OK, now let's look at temperatures.

4:22

Temperatures will range from a minimum of 16°C in Richmond and 17°C in the city,

4:28

Temperatures will range from 16 degrees Celsius.

4:31

We write that as 16 degrees Celsius, with a capital C. If it was in Fahrenheit, we'd

4:40

write 16 degrees Fahrenheit, with a capital F. But in Australia, we use Celsius.

4:48

So when giving a temperature range it is written 16-17°C, or 16 to 17°C.

4:58

These are both read out the same way. Notice that the 'to' is unstressed.

5:04

16-17 degrees Celsius.

5:08

Now we're going to listen to a different weather report.

5:10

Look at it written, and see if you can work out what should be written in the blanks.

5:15

Here is the weather report for Sydney today, Tuesday 14th November.

5:20

The sun will rise at 5:15 and set at 6:45.

5:24

The minimum temperature for metropolitan Sydney will be 13, rising to a maximum of 30 degrees

5:31

Celsius.

5:31

Humidity today promises to be high at 70-80 per cent

5:36

OK, let's have a look at that.

5:40

The weather report for Sydney today, Tuesday the 14th November.

5:45

She said: Tuesday the 14th November.

5:50

The sun will rise at 5:15 and set at 6:45.

5:57

The minimum temperature for metropolitan Sydney will be 13, rising to a maximum of 30 degrees

6:04

Celsius.

6:06

Humidity today promises to be high, 70-80 per cent

6:11

How did you go with that?

6:14

Remember, pronouncing final consonants will help considerably in hearing and understanding

6:19

numbers. This is very important so that listeners understand what you say.

6:24

Listen to the pronunciation of numbers here.

6:27

Humidity will be high again today, ranging from 80-90% across the metropolitan area,

6:33

and possibly for the next 5 or 6 days.

6:37

She says five or six days.

6:40

By linking final consonants with the first vowels of the following word, your speech

6:46

will be much clearer.

6:47

We say:

6:49

5 or 6

6:50

7 and 8

6:52

9 or 10

6:54

OK. Now let's listen for some times:

6:57

Sunrise will be at 5.45 am and the sun will set at 7.43 pm. The next full moon will be

7:04

on December the 9th.

7:06

She says: Sunrise will be at 5:45 am.

7:11

Sunset will be at 7:43 pm.

7:16

Notice the way we say the time. We say the hour and then the minutes as a whole number,

7:22

and we add a.m. for morning, p.m. for afternoon.

7:26

5.45am, five forty five am

7:29

7.43pm, seven forty three pm

7:33

But there are a number of different ways of saying the quarter hours.

7:38

We have:

7:38

7am or 7 o'clock

7:41

7.15 or quarter past 7

7:46

7.45, or quarter to 8

7:51

7.30, half past seven

7:54

Now let's listen to some more of the weather report.

7:58

For those interested in fishing and surfing, windy conditions will prevail all day with

8:03

winds gusting from the southeast from 10-15 knots, then easing to 10-11 knots by late

8:09

afternoon.

8:12

Notice that she says for those interested in fishing and swimming.

8:17

Interested here is a past participle, but it's used as an adjective.

8:22

English verbs have 2 sorts of participles, present and past.

8:29

So the regular verb to interest has interesting, interested.

8:34

bore: boring, bored

8:39

tire: tiring, tired

8:41

excite: exciting, excited

8:47

When we want to say how we feel about something, we can use the past participle.

8:53

I am interested in science.

8:55

I am bored with reading.

8:58

I felt tired after that walk.

9:01

But when we're describing the qualities of a person or thing, we use the present participle.

9:08

Science is interesting.

9:10

A good way to remember these is to make sure you always write a table with the past and

9:15

present participles together.

9:17

You'll notice that the present participle usually ends in -ing, and the past participle

9:25

ends in -ed. But, of course, there are always irregular verbs to watch out for as well.

9:31

And that's all for Study English today. Hope you keep practising those interesting participles.

9:36

They should keep you interested!

9:39

See you next time, bye bye.

#II21Ieltsprepseries1

         TTLS Blog