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Improve Your Writing - 6 ways to compare


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Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you some key words you

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can use when you talk about how things are the same or similar. Okay? So when you compare

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two things -- when you're comparing apples and oranges, there are some similarities.

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They're both fruits. When you're comparing shopping to skiing, when you're comparing

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a city to a country or the countryside -- there is a certain language we like to use when

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we're saying how these things are similar or the same. In this video, I'm going to teach

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you a bunch of expressions you can use when comparing two things to show their similarities.

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Okay? So this video is called "Talking about similarities".

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So for this video, I decided I wanted to do a theme. I wanted to look at how Canada and

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England are similar. In what ways are they very much alike? Okay? So each of my sentences

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are going to have to do with Canada and England, and we're going to look at how they're alike

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using these comparison words.

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So for those of you watching, if you are doing the TOEFL, these words are essential. If you

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are doing the IELTS -- very important vocabulary here. General English, you can use these at

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university for essays, college, or even just general conversation. So let's get started.

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Okay. So how are Canada and England the same? Well, I would say, first of all, both Canada

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and England have a queen. Both Canada and England have Queen Elizabeth. So one word

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we often use when we're talking about similarities is this word, "both". Both Canada and England

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have a queen. Both Canada and England have trees. Both Canada and England have cities.

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Okay? So there are a lot of different things you can compare. This is just one of them.

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Now, I want to say why I wrote the word "beginning" here. "Both" often comes at the beginning

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of a sentence. And notice how the construction is. We have both A and B. Another example,

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"Both cats and dogs are animals." "Both hamsters and mice are rodents." Okay? So we use this

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a lot when we're comparing.

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We can also say "like". In this case, we're not saying, "I like Canada" or "I like" -- you

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know, showing preference -- we're again showing similarity. "Like Canada, England has many

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immigrants." Canada has many immigrants. England has many immigrants. "Like Canada, England

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has many immigrants." And again, you'll notice "like" is at the beginning of the sentence.

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It's often -- not always, but often -- at the beginning. We have it followed by a noun.

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I could change this to something else. Imagine if I wanted to compare cats and dogs.